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Jean Decety: On the role of emotion in the development of moral cognition

Jean Decety
Jean Decety
Föreläsning
Linnaeus environment Cognition, Communication and Learning (CCL) welcomes Professor Jean Decety, University of Chicago.// Abstract: Whether emotion is a source of moral judgment remains controversial. The effect of emotion could occur in the interpretation of the situation, in the interpretation of the question, in the production of the moral judgment or in reporting the judgment as a measurable response. Functional MRI and high-density EEG studies with children and adults which examined the neural response to intentional versus accidental harm, demonstrate that emotion and the perception of intentionality, rather than deliberate reasoning, comprise the vital first component of moral evaluations. I will also argue that moral reasoning is underpinned by specific neural circuitry, but these circuits are not unique to morality; rather, they involve regions and systems underlying specific states of feelings, cognitive and motivational processes. These circuits emerge and are interconnected over the course of development to produce adaptive social behavior.

JEAN DECETY, M.S., PH.D.

Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry

University of Chicago and the College Co-director of the Brain Research Imaging Center University of Chicago Medicine

5848 S. University Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637 - USA
E-mail: decety [at] uchicago.edu
Lab web site:
www.scnl.org
Child Neurosuite: www.childneurosuite.org
Faculty web page:
psychology.uchicago.edu/people/faculty/jdecety.shtml

 

I am interested in understanding how the human brain processes socio-emotional information in the service of adaptive behavior, from a social neuroscience perspective. My research examines the neurobiological and computational mechanisms underlying affective interpersonal processes, in particular empathy, perspective-taking, moral decision-making, and prosocial behavior. I also study the neurodevelopment of social evaluations, moral judgment and moral behavior in infants and children using the latest brain imaging such as functional MRI, and electrophysiological techniques, combined with eye- tracking, autonomic nervous system, behavioral measures and genetics. Because various psychopathologies are characterized by deficits in interpersonal sensitivity, my Lab further explores dysfunctions in the biopsychological mechanisms underpinning social-emotional information processing in children and adults with developmental and personality disorders including aggressive conduct disorder and psychopathy. This multi-level approach (from genes to behavior), bridging affective neuroscience, neurobiology, genetics, developmental science, social and personality psychology, has the unique potential for generating new hypotheses concerning social cognitive disorders and aids our understanding and treatment of abnormal human social behavior.

 

Tid: 
2013-08-23 10:15 till 12:00
Plats: 
Sal 104, Kungshuset
Kontakt: 
eva.sjostrand [at] fil.lu.se

Om händelsen

Tid: 
2013-08-23 10:15 till 12:00
Plats: 
Sal 104, Kungshuset
Kontakt: 
eva.sjostrand [at] fil.lu.se

Box 117, 221 00 LUND
Telefon 046-222 00 00 (växel)
Telefax 046-222 47 20
lu [at] lu [dot] se

Fakturaadress: Box 188, 221 00 LUND
Organisationsnummer: 202100-3211
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