Meny

Du är här

Factor XIII and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in coeliac and inflammatory bowel disease.

Författare:
Publiceringsår: 2002
Språk: Engelska
Sidor: 357-364
Publikation/Tidskrift/Serie: Autoimmunity
Volym: 35
Nummer: 5
Dokumenttyp: Artikel
Förlag: Taylor & Francis

Sammanfattning

Issue transglutaminase (tTg) has been identified as an autoantigen in coeliac disease (CD). There is a marked homology between different forms of transglutaminase, such as tTg and coagulation factor XIII. We compared titres of both IgA- and IgG-antibodies against these two antigens in 20 CD patients, 20 endomysial antibody (EMA)-negative controls and a group with inflammatory bowel disease (34 with Crohn's disease and 23 with ulcerative colitis). IgA-antibodies against tTg correlated with EMA titres and had high sensitivity and specificity in screening for CD. Only in two CD patients were high titres found of IgA-antibodies against factor XIII, non-reactive with tTg. Both lacked bleeding tendency. The presence of IgG-antibodies against tTg, in contrast, had low sensitivity and specificity in screening for CD and were frequently seen in inflammatory bowel disease. Similarly, factor XIII IgG-antibodies displayed a non-specific pattern with modestly elevated titres in patients with Crohn's disease and in both EMA-negative and positive patients. Despite a marked homology with tTg, the occurrence of high titre IgA-antibodies against factor XIII is infrequent in CD, but may--when present--be the result of epitope spreading. The presence of IgG-antibodies in CD and inflammatory bowel disease illustrates the complexity of autoantibody reactions in gastrointestinal disease.

Disputation

Nyckelord

  • Medicine and Health Sciences
  • Autoimmunity
  • Coeliac Disease
  • Endomysial Antibodies
  • Factor Xiii
  • Transglutaminase Antibodies

Övriga

Published
Yes
  • ISSN: 0891-6934

Box 117, 221 00 LUND
Telefon 046-222 00 00 (växel)
Telefax 046-222 47 20
lu [at] lu [dot] se

Fakturaadress: Box 188, 221 00 LUND
Organisationsnummer: 202100-3211
Om webbplatsen